Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

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Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers
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New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Rochelle, NY, December 2, 2015—Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. More than 95% of patients expressed interest in at least one of these types of therapies if offered during their hospital stay, as reported in the article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download for free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until January 2, 2016.

In the article “Improving Patient-Centered Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Prior Use and Interest in Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches Among Hospitalized Oncology Patients,” Rhianon Liu and Maria Chao, DrPH, University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine evaluated the use of 12 different CIH approaches by patients in a surgical oncology ward. The most commonly used were vitamins/nutritional supplements (67%), a special diet (42%), and manual therapies such as massage or acupressure (39%).

The study also assessed patient interest in seven different CIH approaches if they were offered, and more than 40% of patients expressed interest in each treatment, including nutritional counseling (77%) and massage (76%). About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health under Award Numbers T32AT003997, K01AT006545, and K24AT007827, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, under Award Number KL2TR00143.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

 

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New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Rochelle, NY, December 2, 2015—Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. More than 95% of patients expressed interest in at least one of these types of therapies if offered during their hospital stay, as reported in the article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download for free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until January 2, 2016.

In the article “Improving Patient-Centered Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Prior Use and Interest in Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches Among Hospitalized Oncology Patients,” Rhianon Liu and Maria Chao, DrPH, University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine evaluated the use of 12 different CIH approaches by patients in a surgical oncology ward. The most commonly used were vitamins/nutritional supplements (67%), a special diet (42%), and manual therapies such as massage or acupressure (39%).

The study also assessed patient interest in seven different CIH approaches if they were offered, and more than 40% of patients expressed interest in each treatment, including nutritional counseling (77%) and massage (76%). About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health under Award Numbers T32AT003997, K01AT006545, and K24AT007827, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, under Award Number KL2TR00143.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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Call 513-288-4448 to setup a consultation.

Acupuncture Dramatically Reduces Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors, Penn Study Suggests

Acupuncture Dramatically Reduces Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors, Penn Study Suggests

Findings also Highlight Acupuncture’s Ability to Induce a Stronger Placebo Effect than Oral Medications

Released: 3-Sep-2015 11:05 AM EDT
Source Newsroom: Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Newswise — PHILADELPHIA — Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off–limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. The results of the study are published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Though most people associate hot flashes with menopause, the episodes also affect many breast cancer survivors who have low estrogen levels and often undergo premature menopause, following treatment with chemotherapy or surgery,” said lead author Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Family Medicine and Community Health. “These latest results clearly show promise for managing hot flashes experienced by breast cancer survivors through the use of acupuncture, which in previous studies has also been proven to be an effective treatment for joint pain in this patient population.”

Hot flashes are brief episodes of flushing, sweating, racing heartbeat and sensations of heat. Precisely how hot flashes arise isn’t known, though they are closely associated with decreased estrogen levels.

In the trial, the research team enrolled 120 breast cancer survivors, all of whom reported experiencing multiple hot flashes per day. Participants were randomized into four different interventions that would analyze how effectively an acupuncture technique known as electroacupuncture – in which embedded needles deliver weak electrical currents – reduces incidents of hot flashes as compared to the epilepsy drug gabapentin, which was previously shown to be effective in reducing hot flashes for these patients. For an eight-week period, participants received gabapentin (900 mg) daily, gabapentin placebo daily, electroacupuncture (twice per week for two weeks, then once weekly), or “sham” electroacupuncture, which involves no actual needle penetration or electrical current.

After the eight-week treatment period, the subjects in the electroacupuncture group showed the greatest improvement in a standard measure of hot flash frequency and severity, known as the hot flash composite score (HFCS). They were followed by the group that had received the “sham acupuncture” treatment. The gabapentin pill group reported less improvement than the sham acupuncture group, and the placebo pill group placed last.

In addition to reporting the greatest reductions in hot flash frequency/severity, both acupuncture groups reported fewer side effects than either of the pill groups.

The Penn researchers surveyed the subjects sixteen weeks after treatment ended, and found that the electroacupuncture and sham electroacupuncture groups had enjoyed a sustained—and even slightly increased—abatement of hot flashes. The pill-placebo patients also reported a slight improvement in symptoms, whereas the gabapentin pill group reported a worsening.

A Better Placebo
Compared to its sham version, electroacupuncture produced a 25 percent greater reduction in HFCS, suggesting that it really could work better – though the modest size of the study precluded a statistically definitive conclusion. However, the study did show with confidence that the sham acupuncture procedure worked better than a placebo pill at relieving hot flashes, presumably by creating a stronger expectation of benefit.

“Acupuncture is an exotic therapy, elicits the patient’s active participation, and involves a greater patient-provider interaction, compared with taking a pill,” Mao said. “Importantly, the results of this trial show that even sham acupuncture – which is effectively a placebo – is more effective than medications. The placebo effect is often dismissed as noise, but these results suggest we should be taking a closer look at how we can best harness it.”

The sham acupuncture procedure also seemed to create a strikingly lower experience of adverse side effects, which were virtually absent in this group. Only one woman reported an episode of drowsiness from the sham acupuncture, whereas the placebo pill recipients reported eight adverse events such as headache, fatigue, dizziness and constipation.

Some have questioned whether acupuncture has a biological effect apart from the power of suggestion. There is evidence from prior studies that it can boost bloodstream levels of endorphins and related painkilling, mood-elevating molecules more directly than via suggestion. Studies also have found that traditional acupuncture works differently than sham acupuncture in the brain. But for patients, that issue may be moot if they can enjoy dramatic improvements in their quality of life, especially compared to no improvement if they receive no treatment.

Co-authors of the paper were Sharon X. Xie, Angela DeMichele and John T. Farrar of Penn Medicine, Marjorie A. Bowman of Wright State University’s School of Medicine, and Deborah Bruner of Emory University’s School of Nursing.

Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health (K23-AT004112).

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Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.9 billion enterprise.
The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 17 years, according to U.S. News & World Report’s survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation’s top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $409 million awarded in the 2014 fiscal year.
The University of Pennsylvania Health System’s patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania — recognized as one of the nation’s top “Honor Roll” hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; Chester County Hospital; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital — the nation’s first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Chestnut Hill Hospital and Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine.
Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2014, Penn Medicine provided $771 million to benefit our community.

 

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