Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

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New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Rochelle, NY, December 2, 2015—Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. More than 95% of patients expressed interest in at least one of these types of therapies if offered during their hospital stay, as reported in the article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download for free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until January 2, 2016.

In the article “Improving Patient-Centered Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Prior Use and Interest in Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches Among Hospitalized Oncology Patients,” Rhianon Liu and Maria Chao, DrPH, University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine evaluated the use of 12 different CIH approaches by patients in a surgical oncology ward. The most commonly used were vitamins/nutritional supplements (67%), a special diet (42%), and manual therapies such as massage or acupressure (39%).

The study also assessed patient interest in seven different CIH approaches if they were offered, and more than 40% of patients expressed interest in each treatment, including nutritional counseling (77%) and massage (76%). About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health under Award Numbers T32AT003997, K01AT006545, and K24AT007827, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, under Award Number KL2TR00143.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

 

Original Article Link

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New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Study Shows High Use of Complementary Therapies by Cancer Inpatients

New Rochelle, NY, December 2, 2015—Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. More than 95% of patients expressed interest in at least one of these types of therapies if offered during their hospital stay, as reported in the article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download for free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until January 2, 2016.

In the article “Improving Patient-Centered Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Prior Use and Interest in Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches Among Hospitalized Oncology Patients,” Rhianon Liu and Maria Chao, DrPH, University of California, San Francisco, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine evaluated the use of 12 different CIH approaches by patients in a surgical oncology ward. The most commonly used were vitamins/nutritional supplements (67%), a special diet (42%), and manual therapies such as massage or acupressure (39%).

The study also assessed patient interest in seven different CIH approaches if they were offered, and more than 40% of patients expressed interest in each treatment, including nutritional counseling (77%) and massage (76%). About half of participants were interested in acupuncture, biofeedback, and mindfulness meditation.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health under Award Numbers T32AT003997, K01AT006545, and K24AT007827, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, under Award Number KL2TR00143.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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Cincinnati Acupuncture Clinic is an NCCAOM Certified Provider

Call 513-288-4448 to setup a consultation.

Acupuncture May Treat Radiation-Induced Anorexia in Thyroid Cancer

Acupuncture may be an effective treatment for patients with thyroid cancer who experience radioactive-iodine-induced (RAI)-induced anorexia, according to a South Korean study published inIntegrative Cancer Therapies.Researchers led by Ju-Hyun Jeon, KMD, PhD, of Daejeon Korean Medicine Hospital examined 14 patients with thyroid cancer who were randomized to either “true” or sham acupuncture, with patients in both groups given six treatment sessions in two weeks.

Measured outcomes included change in Functional Assessment of Anorexia and Cachexia Treatment (FAACT), Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale (ACS), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), weight, body mass index (BMI), and cortisol levels.

The researchers found that true acupuncture demonstrated a higher increase but with no statistical significance, although there were significant differences between the two groups in an intent-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses of Table of Index (TOI), FACT-G, and FAACT scores.

They also found no significant differences in VAS, weight, BMI, and cortisol levels between the groups.acupuncture needle inserting

“Although the current study is based on a small sample of participants, our findings support the safety and potential use of acupuncture for RAI-induced anorexia and quality of life in thyroid cancer patients,” the authors concluded.

Reference

  1. Keon, Ju-Hyun, KMD, PhD, et al. “Effect of Acupuncture for Radioactive-Iodine-Induced Anorexia in Thyroid Cancer Patients A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Sham-Controlled Pilot Study.”Integrative Cancer Therapies. doi: 10.1177/1534735415570634. [epub ahead of print]. February 17, 2015.

 

Original Article Link

Cincinnati Acupuncture Clinic is an NCCAOM Certified Provider

Call 513-288-4448 to setup a consultation.